I can't say that the folks who made recumbents knew that. This is the
first I've ever heard this thought. I do know that both my
velomobile and triplet use the same Sedis 9 speed chains.

David

On Apr 6, 2011, at 7:03 PM, Mark Boyd wrote:

> Steve:
>
> And i submit that the folks who made the recumbents knew they could
> use weaker chains ;-}. Since they need roughly 2.5 regular chains for
> each recumbent, it makes sense to use chains that cost less and are
> less able to stand side stresses than th chains on a regular bike.
>
> Mark
>
>
>
> On Wed, Apr 6, 2011 at 3:53 PM, David Whitmon
> <whitmon@vineyard.net> wrote:
>> I use the same 9 speed chains on my recumbent velomobile as I do
>> on my
>> Santana triplet.
>>
>> David
>>
>> On Apr 6, 2011, at 3:28 PM, Steve Fuller wrote:
>>
>>> I'd submit that the difference in your chains has nothing to do with
>>> designing around stresses from cross chaining, but is just a
>>> difference in
>>> the general chain design.
>>>
>>> Steve
>>> Sent via BlackBerry from T-Mobile
>>>
>>> -----Original Message-----
>>> From: Mark Boyd <markjboyd@gmail.com>
>>> Sender: bicycletouring@googlegroups.com
>>> Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2011 09:56:55
>>> To: Jeremy Kindy<jeremy.kindy@gmail.com>
>>> Reply-To: markjboyd@gmail.com
>>> Cc: MH<hoagy@nelson-tel.net>; <bicycletouring@googlegroups.com>
>>> Subject: [touring] Chain stress from cross chaining
>>>
>>> This effect is, of course, absent on recumbent. It is also
>>> significantly less of a problem on a touring bike, with long chains
>>> stays, than it is on a racing bike with short chain stays.
>>>
>>> i regularly run middle/big on my touring bikes but hate using in on
>>> racing bike because, with short chain stays, i can hear the chain is
>>> being stressed.
>>>
>>> My recumbents use chains with pins that are very easy to push in or
>>> out. My regular bikes use chain with pins that are very hard to push
>>> in or out and the pins actually damage the side plates when they are
>>> inserted and then removed. That difference is necessary to keep the
>>> chains from breaking when subject to heavy load while cross chained.
>>>
>>> Mark
>>>
>>> PS I changed the title since this thread now has nothing to do with
>>> cranks or STI. Whe you take a thread off in a new direction, you
>>> should change, or add to, its title so folks searching for
>>> information
>>> about the new topic can find it.
>>>
>>> PPS In gmail, at least, there is a button that lets you edit the
>>> title
>>> of your reply.
>>>
>>> On Wed, Apr 6, 2011 at 9:14 AM, Jeremy Kindy
>>> <jeremy.kindy@gmail.com>
>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> My (limited) understanding is that if you use the small-small or
>>>> big-big combinations on a diamond frame bicycle (much shorter
>>>> chain -
>>>> typically around 116 links or less), the chain will wear/stretch
>>>> faster due to the uneven loading because the chain has to "bend"
>>>> from
>>>> the chainrings to the cassette.
>>>>
>>>> See http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gears.html - "What's What" near the
>>>> end of the page.
>>>>
>>>> Jeremy
>>
>> --
>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
>> Groups
>> "bicycletouring" group.
>> To post to this group, send email to bicycletouring@googlegroups.com.
>> To unsubscribe from this group, send email to
>> bicycletouring+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
>> For more options, visit this group at
>> http://groups.google.com/group/bicycletouring?hl=enn
>>
>>

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I didn't know it either until I needed to shorten the chains on both
of my recumbents and discovered that pushing out the pins in those
chains brought back memories of working with chains in the days of
seven speed cogs. It took very little force to push them out. Modern,
high quality, chains that I use, made by both Shimano and SRAM, use
pins that have mushroomed heads to withstand lots of side force.
Recumbent chains don't need to be able to withstand those forces.

 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0=A0 Mark



On Wed, Apr 6, 2011 at 7:27 PM, David Whitmon <whitmon@vineyard.net> wrote:
> I can't say that the folks who made recumbents knew that. This is the fir=
st
> I've ever heard this thought. I do know that both =A0my velomobile and tr=
iplet
> use the same Sedis 9 speed chains.
>
> David
>
> On Apr 6, 2011, at 7:03 PM, Mark Boyd wrote:
>
>> Steve:
>>
>> And i submit that the folks who made the recumbents knew they could
>> use weaker chains ;-}. Since they need roughly 2.5 regular chains =A0for
>> each recumbent, it makes sense to use chains that cost less and are
>> less able to stand side stresses than th chains on a regular bike.
>>
>> =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 Mark
>>
>>
>>
>> On Wed, Apr 6, 2011 at 3:53 PM, David Whitmon <whitmon@vineyard.net>
>> wrote:
>>>
>>> I use the same 9 speed chains on my recumbent velomobile as I do on my
>>> Santana triplet.
>>>
>>> David
>>>
>>> On Apr 6, 2011, at 3:28 PM, Steve Fuller wrote:
>>>
>>>> I'd submit that the difference in your chains has nothing to do with
>>>> designing around stresses from cross chaining, but is just a differenc=
e
>>>> in
>>>> the general chain design.
>>>>
>>>> Steve
>>>> Sent via BlackBerry from T-Mobile
>>>>
>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>> From: Mark Boyd <markjboyd@gmail.com>
>>>> Sender: bicycletouring@googlegroups.com
>>>> Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2011 09:56:55
>>>> To: Jeremy Kindy<jeremy.kindy@gmail.com>
>>>> Reply-To: markjboyd@gmail.com
>>>> Cc: MH<hoagy@nelson-tel.net>; <bicycletouring@googlegroups.com>
>>>> Subject: [touring] Chain stress from cross chaining
>>>>
>>>> This effect is, of course, absent on recumbent. It is also
>>>> significantly less of a problem on a touring bike, with long chains
>>>> stays, than it is on a racing bike with short chain stays.
>>>>
>>>> i regularly run middle/big on my touring bikes but hate using in on
>>>> racing bike because, with short chain stays, i can hear the chain is
>>>> being stressed.
>>>>
>>>> My recumbents use chains with pins that are very easy to push in or
>>>> out. My regular bikes use chain with pins that are very hard to push
>>>> in or out and the pins actually damage the side plates when they are
>>>> inserted and then removed. That difference is necessary to keep the
>>>> chains from breaking when subject to heavy load while cross chained.
>>>>
>>>> =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0Mark
>>>>
>>>> PS I changed the title since this thread now has nothing to do with
>>>> cranks or STI. Whe you take a thread off in a new direction, you
>>>> should change, or add to, its title so folks searching for information
>>>> about the new topic can find it.
>>>>
>>>> PPS In gmail, at least, there is a button that lets you edit the title
>>>> of your reply.
>>>>
>>>> On Wed, Apr 6, 2011 at 9:14 AM, Jeremy Kindy <jeremy.kindy@gmail.com>
>>>> wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>> My (limited) understanding is that if you use the small-small or
>>>>> big-big combinations on a diamond frame bicycle (much shorter chain -
>>>>> typically around 116 links or less), the chain will wear/stretch
>>>>> faster due to the uneven loading because the chain has to "bend" from
>>>>> the chainrings to the cassette.
>>>>>
>>>>> See http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gears.html - "What's What" near the
>>>>> end of the page.
>>>>>
>>>>> Jeremy
>>>
>>> --
>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Grou=
ps
>>> "bicycletouring" group.
>>> To post to this group, send email to bicycletouring@googlegroups.com.
>>> To unsubscribe from this group, send email to
>>> bicycletouring+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
>>> For more options, visit this group at
>>> http://groups.google.com/group/bicycletouring?hl=3Denn
>>>
>>>
>
>

--=20
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oglegroups.com.
For more options, visit this group at http://groups.google.com/group/bicycl=
etouring?hl=3Den.

I used SRAM/Sedis 9 speed quick links on my velomobile.

I haven't used a Shimano chain in over 20 years after breaking 3 of
their chains in short order.

David

On Apr 6, 2011, at 7:43 PM, Mark Boyd wrote:

> I didn't know it either until I needed to shorten the chains on both
> of my recumbents and discovered that pushing out the pins in those
> chains brought back memories of working with chains in the days of
> seven speed cogs. It took very little force to push them out. Modern,
> high quality, chains that I use, made by both Shimano and SRAM, use
> pins that have mushroomed heads to withstand lots of side force.
> Recumbent chains don't need to be able to withstand those forces.
>
> Mark
>
>
>
> On Wed, Apr 6, 2011 at 7:27 PM, David Whitmon
> <whitmon@vineyard.net> wrote:
>> I can't say that the folks who made recumbents knew that. This is
>> the first
>> I've ever heard this thought. I do know that both my velomobile
>> and triplet
>> use the same Sedis 9 speed chains.
>>
>> David
>>
>> On Apr 6, 2011, at 7:03 PM, Mark Boyd wrote:
>>
>>> Steve:
>>>
>>> And i submit that the folks who made the recumbents knew they could
>>> use weaker chains ;-}. Since they need roughly 2.5 regular
>>> chains for
>>> each recumbent, it makes sense to use chains that cost less and are
>>> less able to stand side stresses than th chains on a regular bike.
>>>
>>> Mark
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> On Wed, Apr 6, 2011 at 3:53 PM, David Whitmon <whitmon@vineyard.net>
>>> wrote:
>>>>
>>>> I use the same 9 speed chains on my recumbent velomobile as I do
>>>> on my
>>>> Santana triplet.
>>>>
>>>> David
>>>>
>>>> On Apr 6, 2011, at 3:28 PM, Steve Fuller wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> I'd submit that the difference in your chains has nothing to do
>>>>> with
>>>>> designing around stresses from cross chaining, but is just a
>>>>> difference
>>>>> in
>>>>> the general chain design.
>>>>>
>>>>> Steve
>>>>> Sent via BlackBerry from T-Mobile
>>>>>
>>>>> -----Original Message-----
>>>>> From: Mark Boyd <markjboyd@gmail.com>
>>>>> Sender: bicycletouring@googlegroups.com
>>>>> Date: Wed, 6 Apr 2011 09:56:55
>>>>> To: Jeremy Kindy<jeremy.kindy@gmail.com>
>>>>> Reply-To: markjboyd@gmail.com
>>>>> Cc: MH<hoagy@nelson-tel.net>; <bicycletouring@googlegroups.com>
>>>>> Subject: [touring] Chain stress from cross chaining
>>>>>
>>>>> This effect is, of course, absent on recumbent. It is also
>>>>> significantly less of a problem on a touring bike, with long
>>>>> chains
>>>>> stays, than it is on a racing bike with short chain stays.
>>>>>
>>>>> i regularly run middle/big on my touring bikes but hate using
>>>>> in on
>>>>> racing bike because, with short chain stays, i can hear the
>>>>> chain is
>>>>> being stressed.
>>>>>
>>>>> My recumbents use chains with pins that are very easy to push
>>>>> in or
>>>>> out. My regular bikes use chain with pins that are very hard to
>>>>> push
>>>>> in or out and the pins actually damage the side plates when
>>>>> they are
>>>>> inserted and then removed. That difference is necessary to keep
>>>>> the
>>>>> chains from breaking when subject to heavy load while cross
>>>>> chained.
>>>>>
>>>>> Mark
>>>>>
>>>>> PS I changed the title since this thread now has nothing to do
>>>>> with
>>>>> cranks or STI. Whe you take a thread off in a new direction, you
>>>>> should change, or add to, its title so folks searching for
>>>>> information
>>>>> about the new topic can find it.
>>>>>
>>>>> PPS In gmail, at least, there is a button that lets you edit
>>>>> the title
>>>>> of your reply.
>>>>>
>>>>> On Wed, Apr 6, 2011 at 9:14 AM, Jeremy Kindy
>>>>> <jeremy.kindy@gmail.com>
>>>>> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>> My (limited) understanding is that if you use the small-small or
>>>>>> big-big combinations on a diamond frame bicycle (much shorter
>>>>>> chain -
>>>>>> typically around 116 links or less), the chain will wear/stretch
>>>>>> faster due to the uneven loading because the chain has to
>>>>>> "bend" from
>>>>>> the chainrings to the cassette.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> See http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gears.html - "What's What"
>>>>>> near the
>>>>>> end of the page.
>>>>>>
>>>>>> Jeremy
>>>>
>>>> --
>>>> You received this message because you are subscribed to the
>>>> Google Groups
>>>> "bicycletouring" group.
>>>> To post to this group, send email to
>>>> bicycletouring@googlegroups.com.
>>>> To unsubscribe from this group, send email to
>>>> bicycletouring+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
>>>> For more options, visit this group at
>>>> http://groups.google.com/group/bicycletouring?hl=enn
>>>>
>>>>
>>
>>

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